More fodder for evidence-based diets

UPDATE: In a post on evidence-based diets, I wrote about the potential benefits to be gained if private chef, meal replacement, or even frozen dinner companies would structure their meals around evidence of benefits from particular dietary combinations, which could in turn be tailored to customer demographics: Garanimals for your tummy.

This WSJ article on nutrients in your diet describes some of the connections between diet, mainly of vitamins and trace minerals, and health from an immune response perspective. One more reason to look at all the studies and dietary pieces as a consolidated whole rather than “take two fish oil caplets a day.”

3 Comments

  1. Follow-up: evidence based diets on October 17, 2010 at 4:30 pm

    […] But, I can see there being some value to this type of easily understood distillation of typically complex research papers. (Certainly the autism community could use this if only to collect the research in one place.) I see this as a neat add-on to the orphan idea proposal for evidence-based diets, one that ties to other diet-related projects. […]

  2. […] an interesting take on my idea for an evidence-based diet: an app that spits out recipes based on ingredients you feed it. (I should really edit that […]

  3. Follow-up: evidence based diets on May 11, 2015 at 2:16 pm

    […] But, I can see there being some value to this type of easily understood distillation of typically complex research papers. (Certainly the autism community could use this if only to collect the research in one place.) I see this as a neat add-on to the orphan idea proposal for evidence-based diets, one that ties to other diet-related projects. […]

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